Tag Archives: text messaging

Library News: Digital public library with vast archive opens, ‘Libraries’ come in all shapes and sizes these days, US Presidential Libraries Contribute to Research, Education

Children read at the Centre de Lecture et d'Animation Culturelle (CLAC) in Byblos. [Photo courtesy of CLAC Byblos]

Library director hope smart phone app will help slow declining circulation

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Sacramento library adds 3-D copier to its bag of tricks

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Digital public library with vast archive opens

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Library Usage Increases

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Holyoke to promote child literacy by creating ‘mini-libraries’ at police substations, stocking cruisers with books

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‘Libraries’ come in all shapes and sizes these days

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York County Libraries to release mobile app, YCL Mobile

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lsley Library provides digital local newspaper collections

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Libraries are vital to the community

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Study: People still see value of libraries

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Baylor Central Libraries buys almanac signed by Ben Franklin

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Aztec Library expands technology with free tech classes, smartphone app

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Library continues expanding collection

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Cambridge libraries go beyond the bookmobile

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Library releases app for phones

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Libraries set to provide free wi-fi

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Libraries still relevant today

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US Presidential Libraries Contribute to Research, Education

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Public libraries in Lebanon: a novel phenomenon

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Siouxland libraries strive to be more than just book places

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Public Library Extends Helping Hands for Computer Literacy

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National Library of Scotland to hire ‘Wikipedian’

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George Demko: Library is as relevant as ever in electronic age

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Libraries are a tech and reading hub

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Saving America for posterity at the Library of Congress

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Found and listed by Mosio for Libraries – Patron Support Software for Libraries. All copyright belongs to original owners.

Library News Update: Library of Congress – 170 billion tweets, e-book Checkout System, Libraries Transforming in the Digital Age

The reading room at the Library of Congress's historic Thomas Jefferson Building in Washington, D.C.

Library Stairs: A Newly Adorned Celebration Of Reading

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Library of Congress digs into 170 billion tweets

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Sonoma County Library unveils e-book checkout system

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Book robot among features at new NC State library

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10,000 Smashwords E-books Acquired by Douglas County Libraries

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Turning a new page: Libraries hoping to attract new ‘customers

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Libraries Upgrade Technology

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New Approach Urged for Libraries

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How Modern Libraries Are Changing

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Local Libraries Work To Accommodate Tech Savvy Readers

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Israeli Library’s Manuscripts Provide First Physical Proof of Ancient Afghani Jewry

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New Report on Libraries Transforming in the Digital Age

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Use libraries’ resources; embrace changes in library systems

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Found and listed by Mosio’s Text a Librarian – Patron Support Software for Libraries. All copyright belongs to original owners.

 

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Library News: E-books on Loan, Libraries will collect “Food for Fines”, Tips for a Stress-Free Library Experience

Rochester Library Can Now Text You When Your Favorite Author’s Latest Book Hits Shelves

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Libraries’ literacy program helps meet families’ needs

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E-books on loan from Frackville, Orwigsburg libraries

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Public libraries evolving with technology

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Take your libraries seriously

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Libraries across the world

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Libraries will collect “Food for Fines”

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New York Public Library Renovation: First Visualizations Released

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Stolen Little Free Library Finds Its Way Home

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Longmont Public Library patrons will have access to millions of titles

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Tips for a Stress-Free Library Experience

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Library Reading Garden Blooming Soon!

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E-book service at Staunton library

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Library hosts tech sessions to boost gadget know-how

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Branching out: New technology should free library staff for other tasks

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Library News: Libraries launches text-message service, Do-it-yourself checkouts, Offers Google Chromebooks

A library worth checking out

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Indoor lawns help students handle stress

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Library offers Google Chromebooks, free Wi-Fi

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On the Spectrum: Little Free Libraries’ top 3,000

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Tufts Libraries launches text-message service

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Do-it-yourself checkouts proliferating at suburban libraries 

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Digital age bringing changes to offerings of local libraries

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Libraries help low-income families get connected

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Oldest book in NDSU library uncovered

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Public school libraries increase use of mobile technology

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Compiled by Mosio’s helpdesk software for libraries. All copyright belongs to original owners.

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7 Things Library Customers Want NOW | Customer Service and Library Patrons

Free Patron Support Tips via Email – Sign up!

7 Things Library Customers Want NOW

What attracts library customers to today’s libraries? The rise of mobile culture and the smart phone society brings a dynamic shift in expectations about how, when, and where to access information. Endless media streams, interactive news feeds, and autonomous research options provide numerous avenues for information-seeking customers. What factors draw their attention to the library, rather than a crowdsourced data channel, commercial service, or search engine?

1.    Convenience. Mobile customers use text messaging constantly and carry on multiple conversations concurrently. Libraries offering SMS services to manage reference, information, or patron relationships fit seamlessly into to this information exchange and can interact directly with the customers at the point of need.

2.    Community. Libraries serve an essential role as a leading provider of educational programs, local events, after school and family activities, and employment and business resource centers. Announcements, notifications, mailing lists, newsletters, and social media are effective options for community interaction, library marketing, and advocacy.

3.    Immediacy. Libraries partner with other libraries around the city, county, state, and country, and make use of these established networks to connect readers and researchers with necessary information. From integrated request systems to on-site kiosks, libraries support patron self-service, both inside and outside of library buildings.

4.    Accuracy. Librarians deliver experienced, trained, and intuitive support to readers and researchers seeking specific content. Rich collections are enhanced by a curator’s historical knowledge, detailed research questions are handled by subject specialists, and so on. Library services delivered via IM (instant messaging), allow librarians to handle complete questions while providing direct access to supporting documentation and online resources.

5.    Customization. Once accurate content is identified, librarians provide expertise, synthesis, analysis, feedback, and references, without bias, in the context of the inquiry.

6.    Privacy. Libraries’ privacy practices are published and non-negotiable: private records are not made public, sold to advertisers, or shared with other agencies.

7.    Service. Regular library users recognize the value of direct support, local context, and personal attention. These strengths, built and enhanced through patron relationships, set outstanding libraries apart from the competition.

About the Author
Lisa Carlucci Thomas is the Director and Founder of Design Think Do, providing innovation and technology consulting to libraries, publishers, and information partners. Follow Lisa on Twitter @lisacarlucci

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The ubiquity imperative and the economics of attention – The competition for patron engagement

“How many people with short attention spans does it take to screw in a light bulb-wanna go on a bike ride?”

An article from Ryan Lawler on GigaOm the other day, the ubiquity imperative and the economics of attention shines a bright light on the importance of ubiquity among content companies clamoring for the attention of consumers. It struck a chord with me in the context of libraries from the simple fact that patrons are always customers to companies, in and out of the library.

While the post speaks specifically to video content, the message is clear:
“…consumers are now in charge of when and how they [consume] content. No longer content to be stuck to someone else’s schedule, consumers expect to be able to access their favorite content whenever they want and on a wide range of devices. As a result, the media companies that will win are those that recognize the need to be everywhere.” Full GigaOm Article here

Libraries have to be everywhere, on every device, to compete for patron attention. More time and money to spend, more technologies to sign up for and support. Not great news, but also not entirely true.

The strategy many libraries are implementing to solve this: Pick and choose your battles by choosing ubiquitous technologies rather than trying to be everywhere. For example, in mobile technologies, if you want to reach the largest amount of patrons on their mobile phones, you have 2 great choices: voice calls and text messaging. All mobile phones, smart or not-smart (aka “feature phones”) have both capabilities and are used by nearly everyone. At Mosio, we say “texting is the new talking”, not because we don’t enjoy talking to people, but because people are texting more than they’re talking on mobile phones. It’s simple, more efficient and enables time-shifting for busy schedules.

There are some amazing mobile technologies in the world. If we had unlimited resources and time, I’d have a developer working on as many as possible, but I don’t know any organization that has unlimited resources. With mobile messaging utilized twice as much as voice calls on mobile phones in the U.S. and around the world, we happily have our hands full offering solutions available to the largest amount of mobile users.

SMS FTW,

Noel

Library Mobile Apps: Developing an iPhone app is more expensive than most people think.

Reposted for Libraries from Mosio’s Company Blog

Text Messaging is Used by Consumers Twice as Much as Mobile Apps

A colleague sent me a stack overflow thread today entitled “How much does it cost to develop iPhone applications?” It’s worth taking a look at, most interesting is an answer suggesting around $10,000 ($50/hr for a Developer and $50/hr for a Graphic Designer x 200 total hours), which the stack overflow community quickly jumped on, providing insight and information to back up a more realistic $50k-100k (and some say $200k) price tag.

At Mosio, naturally we get asked about mobile applications from clients all the time. I love my MacBook Pro, iPhone and iPad, but Apple has spent plenty of money in advertising to convince us all that “There’s an App for That.” They even spent money trademarking the phrase and that’s fine, they benefit by doing so. The craziest thing about the mobile apps hype is that it caters to less than 1/3 of the mobile subscriber market. Consider recent research about Mobile Content Usage for the month of July 2010 in the image above from Wireless Week:

Among all U.S. mobile subscribers ages 13+:
31.4% Used a Downloaded App
33.6% Used a [Mobile] Browser
66% Sent a text message to another phone

Why, then, do people think it’s so inexpensive to develop iPhone apps?
I’m not exactly sure, but my guess is that it’s a combination of people wanting to believe it costs less combined with the misinformation from people selling shoddy development services or app workarounds trying to capitalize on the hype. And before those of you developing “affordable” iPhone applications start flaming me in the comments, consider the fact that by saying it’s inexpensive and cheap, you’re essentially selling yourselves short, commoditizing your expertise. The misinformation hurts your skills and service.

The world is mobile and we want to provide a mobile experience beyond text messaging. What should we do?

If you are a library and looking for a great way to mobilize your website or catalog, we recommend you visit our friends at Boopsie. They have a great team and wonderful experience in helping libraries on an existing platform that makes the process simple.

Mosio CEO Interview on UNTETHER.tv Discussing Text Messaging in the Mobile Workforce and Text a Librarian

I was interviewed by Rob Woodbridge @RobWoodbridge last week on UTETHER.tv (conversations with mobile industry rock stars). In the interview we discuss how Jay Sachdev and I got into the mobile business, our flagship product “Text a Librarian” and our new mobile software as a service product for mobile workforce automation, FieldForce Mobile.

Thanks Rob for the great interview!

Video embedded below:

Text Messaging: The New 800 Number in Customer Service and Advertising Response

Traditional Customer Feedback

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Augmenting Toll Free 800 Numbers With Mobile Text Messaging for Customer Service
Americans are texting more than they’re talking, a trend that’s likely to grow more than slow down over the next 5-10 years. It’s easy and it’s quick. The popularity and usage of texting is no surprise as the on-the-go lifestyle ends up being more like living than a style type. The truth is, people are still going to use the phone to talk, but the growing usage of text messaging across all demographics shows more people prefer text messaging.

Customers Will Be Heard
The bell curve above illustrates how customer feedback has traditionally been given: in person, comment card, telephone and email. It used to be an extremely effective way to give feedback to a company. But with the growth of social media, customers are being heard by their friends, co-workers and strangers whether they are happy or unhappy with a product or service. Some companies have taken to Twitter to handle customer service issues, but “we’re on Twitter” is not a social media customer service strategy (and it’s certainly not a mobile customer service strategy).

I’m not suggesting companies using Twitter don’t continue to do so, but reacting to a tweet about a bad experience is like someone yelling “this food sucks!” in a crowded restaurant: you can run over and help your upset patron, but the damage has been done. That’s the obvious reason why so many companies are jumping into the social media space: they have to do so to protect their brand image. But there’s another way to protect one’s brand image: make yourself more available to communicate directly with your customers.

Text Messaging: New Customer Conversations

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Text Messages: Direct Customer Conversations
If people are texting twice as much as they are talking and they’re using text messaging and mobile apps on their phones to update their status and communicate with friends, companies need to make themselves available via the mobile channel. People are posting their loves and dislikes for a product or service on social media services because it’s easy to do so. Integrating text messaging gives companies an opportunity to start a customer conversation using the medium customers prefer and keep the conversation between them. Is it going to stop everyone from ranting on updates and blogs when they’re upset? No, but it opens up dialogue with more possible customers at a fraction of the cost of 800 tolls or chasing down posts online.

Text Messaging Beyond Customer Service: Direct Response in Marketing and Advertising
I hate the word “blast” when it comes to mobile marketing and it’s a word used far too often in our industry. Customers don’t want to be blasted on their mobile phones. In fact, it’s the last place they’d want to be communicated with in such a way. The mobile medium offers so much to traditional advertising with more and more research showing mobile getting better response rates than online advertising.

We soft launched a mobile advertising response product with a few marketing and advertising agencies and are getting great feedback. The system lets customers help themselves get more information immediately using their mobile devices. Text messaging as a method of responding to ads, whether they be print, TV, billboards, posters or flyers is going to be a huge hit in 2010 and beyond. Used in customer service, direct response or as a helpline for a brand, mobile text messaging is still in its infancy. What’s better, you don’t need “an app for that” to use it in your business.

For information on how Mosio can help you set up mobile text messaging customer satisfaction, service and feedback systems,contact us or visit www.mosio.com.

How Important is Patron Privacy at Your Library? 5 Tips for Increased Security

How Important is Patron Privacy at Your Library?

How Important is Patron Privacy at Your Library?

I’ve never ever had a librarian tell me “we do not care about patron privacy or security at our library.”  And come to think of it, I haven’t had them even say it’s not that big of a deal. Security breaches stink and they can be harmful as the news of Twitter’s secret information exposed shows.  But they’re also embarrassing and ultimately very time consuming for those involved.  What’s more, there are simple things that can be done to avoid them, keep things secure and keep patron (and librarian) information private.

In the past 2 weeks, I have seen or read about 3 serious instances of security/privacy issues that could have been avoided if people within organizations would have been a little more careful or at least aware that their actions were viewable by others:

1) A user id and password posted on a blog by a library. We notified them to let them know.
2) A user id and password tweeted from one twitter user to their client, unaware that their @reply could be seen by others.
3) Twitter getting hacked by someone guessing an employee’s password on a Google Apps account.

I had a quick talk with our CTO to find out what he would say are 5 helpful security tips for libraries, or any business for that matter, to consider.  He gave me 6, the nice guy.

1. Whenever possible, don’t share user ID/logins between librarians.
Every time a login is shared, you’re creating more of an opportunity for a security breach.  The same as trying to keep a secret: the more people you tell, the more chances of it not being a secret.  The idea here is that if something happens, you can delete that user without disrupting everyone else.  Sometimes you have to share log-ins.  Understandable, so if you have to share, make sure the password is VERY unique but easy for everyone to remember.  Consider changing it regularly.

2. Assume that blogs, wikis, websites, Twitter, Facebook, etc, are viewable by the public and that everyone can read them.
It’s actually not the case, many of them can be hidden behind passwords, but as long as people second guess what they’re posting and thinking it’s possible for someone to see, you are creating a more secure environment.

3. Use or create systems that don’t show or store private patron information.
This is the one we see the most, unfortunately.  It’s done using hacks and work-arounds in the name of simplification, cost cutting, etc.  One of the librarians who advises us said “many people are using hacks because they want to be able to offer services to patrons, but I’m seeing more people understand it is simply not worth the risk.”  We believe if you can see a patron’s information, others can too.  If you’re using Google products, you have to delete information 3 times: inbox, sent box and then the trash (information is stored in the trash folder).  Sound a little paranoid?  Ok, but understand this is a blog post about security tips.  We care about security and hope you appreciate it.

4. Use Google Alerts for your library name to ensure that information posted about your library is what you want it to be.
These are easy to set up and easy to manage.  You can set them for select words/terms (the name of your library for starters) and control when they’re sent to you.  If someone is posting information about your library, you may not be able to get them to remove it, but at least you’ll know what it is.  Besides the security element, they can be pretty fun and you’ll be able to see when people are tweeting about how much they love you.

5. HTTPS: The “S” is for “Secure”
This is something you might not be able to do on your own, you’ll have to speak with IT or ask any web services you’re using if they offer it.  Simply stated, if you’re on a Wifi (most libraries are), or any sort of LAN network, and you login to a page without HTTPS, anyone in the network can sniff out your password.  HTTPS is what banks and/or credit card companies use online.

BONUS TIP (thanks Jay!)
6. If you only have one strong password, make sure it’s your email password!

Password “reset links” all work via email.  If someone can log into your email, they can get into anything.  Make sure your email password is used ONLY for your email and that it’s hard to guess.

So there you have them.  If anyone thinks of any more, please feel free to post them in the comments section.  There are obviously various ways hackers can cause harm, recently some experts found that they can get private information from an iPhone security flaw through text messagaging.  The difference is that some security issues are things hackers are going to find ways into.  The others are choices people can make to be a little more secure.


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